Proverbs 3:5-6
“Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths.”

Born the son of slaves in the early 1860s, George Washington Carver grew up to become one of America’s most prominent chemists. Though most people recognize him as the man who gave us peanut butter, few know that Carver was a scientist with a very close relationship with his Creator.

American botanist and inventor George Washington Carver at work in his laboratoryAs we learn from the book, George Washington Carver: His Life and Faith in His Own Words by William Federer, after speaking to the U.S. House and Ways Committee, the committee chairman asked him where he had learned so much about peanuts. Carver responded: “From an old book.” The chairman asked: “What book?” And Carver replied, “The Bible.”

Wishing to know more, the chairman then asked, “Does the Bible tell about peanuts?” And Carver responded, “No sir. But it tells about the God who made the peanut. I asked Him to show me what to do with the peanut, and He did.”

On a different occasion, when asked the secret of his success, he answered: “It is simple. It is found in the Bible, ‘In all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy paths.'”

While working in his laboratory – which he called “God’s Little Workshop” – Carver developed over 300 innovative uses for peanuts and another 100 uses for the soybean, including beverages, cosmetics, paints, medicines, and food products.

So the next time an evolutionist tells you that men of faith can’t be real scientists, tell him the story of Mr. Peanut.

Prayer:
Heavenly Father, You take delight in humble men and women who acknowledge You as Creator. I pray that You will continue to raise up scientists of faith so they will glorify You and Your Son, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Notes:
Federer, William J. (2002). George Washington Carver: His Life and Faith in His Own Words. St. Louis: Amerisearch. Photo: American botanist and inventor George Washington Carver at work in his laboratory. (PD)