Genesis 1:1
“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.”

After three months of number crunching, using 8,000 computers running in parallel, scientists say they have been able to build a model of our “evolving universe” in a computer simulation.

From the Illustris simulationThe simulated universe is called Illustris. It not only shows what the universe looks like now. It shows what it looked like in the past. Discovery.com notes that the simulation “only uses equations from theories constructed from decades (even centuries) of astronomical observations and allowed to evolve with time. The result,” they said, “is nothing short of breathtaking and it can be hard to distinguish the model from real observations.”

Even so, the scientists behind Illustris admit there are “anomalies in the simulation that don’t match our observations.” This should come as no surprise to creationists. After all, how could a computer simulation based on “equations from theories” match what we find in the real universe? How sad that these scientists spend so much time trying to show how the universe began without God. God’s fingerprints can be clearly seen all over the creation – especially in the stars, nebulae and galaxies He created on the fourth day of Creation Week.

If scientists spent some of their time searching the Scriptures rather than the starry skies, they might develop an even better simulation. In fact, they might even discover the One who created the universe and died so that they might have everlasting life.

Prayer:
Father, I pray for the work of creationists involved in the sciences – that they would make significant scientific contributions that cannot be ignored by scoffers and Bible skeptics. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

Notes:
http://news.discovery.com/space/galaxies/mind-blowing-computer-simulation-recreates-our-universe-140507.htm. “Mind-Blowing Computer Simulation Recreates Our Universe”, Discovery News, 5/7/14. Ian O’Neill. Photo: From the Illustris simulation. Used for educational purposes under the Fair Use provisions.